Pêche
Arpège, a safer, greener, more economical trawler

Actualité

Arpège, a safer, greener, more economical trawler

Pêche

Arpège — an innovative demonstration trawler featuring diesel-electric propulsion — is now undergoing her first refit after completing 4000 hours of trial fishing expeditions conducted by owner Alexis Hagneré since delivery in October 2015. The boat (length overall: 24m; beam: 8.5m) was built by Socarenam. According to the project managers, Arpège has performed well and met the expectations of her owner/skipper who reports that the trials enabled him and his crew to learn not only how to work with the boat, but also how to use Danish seine gear which is new to this part of France.

A product of the ‘Ships of the future’ programme

Arpège was developed under France’s ‘Ships of the future’ programme to advance R&D and innovation that contribute to making vessels safer, more environment friendly, and more economical. The programme received €2 million in government funding and is estimated to have cost a total of around €8.2 million.

French boat- and shipbuilder Socarenam initiated the programme and acted as prime contractor. The programme partners included naval architecture firm Bureau Mauric, energy specialist ENAG for propulsion system customisation, maritime electronics specialist Marinelec for power optimisation and the development of the power management and control system, and iXBlue for the optimisation of the bottom-scanning sonar. Socarenam is based at Boulogne-sur-Mer on France’s Channel coast.

Power/displacement ratio

Arpège has a full-load displacement of 300 tonnes and a transit speed of 10 knots. The boat is powered by a pair of 221-kW ABB electric motors receiving electrical power from two Caterpillar C18 variable-speed diesel generator sets. The 10-knot transit speed meets the design specification despite the relatively low overall power rating of 442kW, confirming the design’s excellent propulsion power/displacement ratio. The results owe

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