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Sibiril and Delion unveil new 14.5m, all-weather pilot boat

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Sibiril and Delion unveil new 14.5m, all-weather pilot boat

Construction Navale
Vie Portuaire

The Sibiril Technologies boatyard in Carentec, Brittany, and Pierre Delion, a Nantes-based naval architecture bureau, unveiled their new pilot boat at the Navexpo International trade fair in Lorient on 11 May 2016. With a length of 14.5 metres, a beam of 4.8 metres and a light displacement of around 14 tonnes, the new boat can carry up to ten people and features an all-weather design offering the sort of performance normally only expected of boats in the 15.5 to 16m range. “We drew on the experience gained building the 12m ST‑P 120 IPS pilot boat delivered to the Cherbourg station two years ago and commissioned to do the work of a conventional 14m design. This time, the challenge was to build a 14.5m boat able to handle all-weather conditions and be responsive and handy while performing like a 16m design,” explained Pierre Delion. “Safety, reliability and cost-effectiveness were the project watchwords. With an optimised design, an all-weather hull, and well thought-out trade-offs between size, ruggedness, engine power and seakeeping, we developed a more compact model that is less expensive to build and operate. Yet we still managed to provide plenty of space, including good headroom,” added Tristan Pouliquen, head of operations at Sibiril Technologies.

 

Sibiril 12m pilot boat (ST‑P 120 IPS) delivered to the Cherbourg station in 2014 (© Sibiril Technologies)

Sibiril 12m pilot boat (ST‑P 120 IPS) delivered to the Cherbourg station in 2014 (© Sibiril Technologies)

 

Propulsion using Volvo Penta IPS 2 pods

The new composite-hull boat offers remarkable performance thanks to two 650‑hp engines coupled to Volvo Penta IPS 2 pods. “The pods consume 25 to 30% less fuel than more conventional propulsion arrangements. Overall, the design offers good acceleration and manoeuvrability, not to mention high speed, but its chief feature is that it has power to spare, making it safer all round,” said Tristan Pouliquen, emphasising that using powerful engines for a boat of this size means that they work less hard at most engine speeds. Depending on the final specifications, the boat should easily manage a top speed of 34 knots.

The benefits of close collaboration

This new model is the result of close collaboration between the boatbuilder and the naval architects who worked together to develop a product combining past experience and moderate construction costs. The joint project drew on the experience of the Sibiril Technologies yard and the expertise of naval architects Pierre Delion who specialise in workboats. “Boatyard and architects worked together from the design concept stage to give the boatbuilders the freedom they needed to use their preferred working methods. We are now used to working with Sibiril and, thanks to our partnership, managed to get the weight and balance right while using shared work methods throughout,” explained Pierre Delion.

New range

After completing their latest project, the partners decided to develop a range of pilot boats. The first was the ST‑P 120 IPS based on the prototype built for Cherbourg; the second, a derivative ordered recently for the marine pilots at Le Havre. Next was the 14.5m model, which will be followed by a new 10.5m model based on a single-engine type designed for extremely low operating costs. The boats are built jointly by the Sibiril Technologies and Pierre Delion partnership for both domestic and international clients. “We are looking to supply pilot stations all over the world, given that pilots in many countries are already using boats of a similar size to our 14.5m model.”

 

ST-P120 for Le Havre (© Sibiril Technologies - Archi Delion)

ST-P120 for Le Havre (© Sibiril Technologies - Archi Delion)

 

An ST‑P 120 for Le Havre next year

While prospecting for further orders, Sibiril Technologies is busy building the ST‑P 120 IPS ordered for the Le Havre marine pilot station and scheduled for delivery in March 2017.

At the same time, Sibiril Technologies is working on a new generation of CTT NG all-weather lifeboats for the SNSM, the French sea rescue association. The second one is due to be launched in September.

 

The first CTT NG, named in 2016 (© Mer et Marine - Caroline Britz)

The first CTT NG, named in 2016 (© Mer et Marine - Caroline Britz)

 

Written by Vincent Groizeleau, translated by Steve Dyson

 

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